What you'll see: Doctor Who, comic book geekery, gorgeous men, silliness.
Reblogged from dresdencodak  3,154 notes

Dresden Codak’s X-MEN REBOOT

dresdencodak:

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The Premise - I wanted to make an X-Men reboot that plays to the strength of the concepts, namely growing up as a teenager, dealing with those who are different and how to deal with those who hate you.  The primary change in my setting is that the mutations have a clear sci-fi foundation rather than just being random superpowers.  Mutants being “the next stage in human evolution” was biologically dubious in the 60s, and now it’s just corny.  Additionally, I think the X-Men premise only really makes sense in a setting without other superheroes.  With that in mind, here’s my pitch…

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Reblogged from postcardsfromspace  2,671 notes

The Myth of Credibility

kellysue:

nicksmedulla:

I’ve never had my geek cred questioned. No one asks me if I “actually read this stuff” as I work behind the counter of my LCS. When I say how much I enjoy a book like Ms. Marvel or Wonder Woman, people take me on my word. When I check out a store in another town, I’m asked what series I collect, not what I’m doing there. If only these people knew I wasn’t “one of them”.

I was 19 the first time I ever set foot in a comic book store. I wasn’t even there to buy a “real comic”, instead leaving with the first two volumes of Scott Pilgrim. It took two years for me to actually set up my first subscription, for the then newly announced Adventure Time. I was late to the party on Saga, Hawkeye, Captain Marvel, Ultimate Spider-Man - books that are now some of my favorites - and I’d never read an issue of Batman until I was working in a comic shop. If I were held to the same standard half the comic reading population is, I’d be branded as a fake.

Instead, I’m seen as an expert by the customers of my store, in equal parts it seems because of my position and gender. When someone brings up a series I am unfamiliar with I can deflect with a simple “let me check if we have that in” and no one questions if I know what I’m doing. People want and take my suggestions of what to read, even though I was the one receiving those same recommendations just a year or two ago. While my job has afforded me the opportunity to catch up on many of the “classics”, I’ve still not gotten through much of the Marvel and DC catalog. Instead I sometimes have to rely on what I know from Wikipedia pages and secondhand accounts. There’s a part of me that is always concerned I’ll be called out as a fake, but in reality, it’s unlikely to ever happen. I get to be a part of the club because I look the part.

I’ll be going to my very first convention in March with a friend who has read comics her entire life. She actually understands exactly what happened in the New 52 continuity shift and can tell you how the plot of the Avengers movie mirrors the original Stan Lee and Jack Kirby issues. If she were a guy, she’d be considered a true fan by any standard. But when she goes to a store, she gets one of two reactions. Either she’ll just be ignored, which at this point she prefers, or she’ll be subjected to a series of increasingly difficult trivia questions, trying to prove her assumed ignorance. A Batman backpack and Wonder Woman key-chain she carries with her every day aren’t enough to convince someone she’s a fan. No one asks here about her opinions on DC’s handling of Cassandra Cain and Stephanie Brown. Instead she’s asked if she’s there to get something for a boyfriend. At every turn her credibility is questioned.

This entire idea of “credibility”, however, is the real problem. The biggest lie at the center of the “fake geek girl” phenomena is that there are legitimate and illegitimate ways to enjoy comics. Regardless of gender, someone who has only seen the Marvel movies and someone who has all 700 issues of Amazing Spider-Man are both justified in calling themselves comic fans. There shouldn’t be rankings; there shouldn’t be tiers. If you prefer Tomine or Liefeld or Staples;
big two or independents; collecting variants or buying during Comixology sales - none of that should matter. The diversity of this amazing medium is reflected in the unique way each person approaches it and chooses to enjoy it. I’m not suggesting that some people aren’t more passionate about comics than others, but passion = interest + time. By excluding people as they’re just starting out, we’re not giving them a chance to let their passion for comics develop.

We need to work to dismantle this idea of credibility whenever we get the chance and catch ourselves when we’re buying into it. If you’ve ever felt superior to someone else because you knew more about comics, I want you to really think about what you gained from it. Instead of bragging about what you know, share something new with someone who doesn’t. Be the person you wish you’d met when you read your first comic. Remember we all start somewhere and invite someone new to our club.

Be the person you wish you’d met when you read your first comic,” he says.  

I love that as a fandom credo. 

Reblogged from dogbomber  25,976 notes

dogbomber:

Let’s Draw: Lady Knights

Compiled them all into a photoset. The prompts, respectively:1) Fists, Top Heavy, Nervous, Indian, Shark/Piscine
2) Bow, Petite, Honest, Spanish, Boar
3) Staff, Skinny, Evil, Aztec, Insectoid
4) Mace, Bulky, Mischievous, Russian, Big Cat
5) Axe, Short, Glum, Japanese, Snake
6) Sword, Athletic, Bashful, Roman, Bird of Prey
7) Shield, Perky, Plump, English, Rabbit

Another fun exercise! At the moment I’m thinking up another prompt to try. Hopefully it’ll be just as interesting!

Reblogged from fluxsymmetry  160,607 notes
thepfa:

nohetero:

scottthepilgrim:

which fucking fedora wearing friendzoned nerd made this thing

yeah but notice that the seal’s intent is to eat those fish and the shark offers a mutually beneficial relationship for them
in which a dudebro unintentionally makes a really accurate analogy for the reason that they’re single forever

That’s a whale shark. They’re docile and in no way threatening to people or those fish depicted. Seals, by contrast, will attack people, possibly out of a frustrated sense of entitlement combined with poor socialization skills.

thepfa:

nohetero:

scottthepilgrim:

which fucking fedora wearing friendzoned nerd made this thing

yeah but notice that the seal’s intent is to eat those fish and the shark offers a mutually beneficial relationship for them

in which a dudebro unintentionally makes a really accurate analogy for the reason that they’re single forever

That’s a whale shark. They’re docile and in no way threatening to people or those fish depicted. Seals, by contrast, will attack people, possibly out of a frustrated sense of entitlement combined with poor socialization skills.

Reblogged from ethevagabond  113,626 notes

ask-the-multishipper:

becauseimwolfit:

catbountry:

thefrogman:

Usually when people do that “you’re special” crap I tend to roll my eyes.

But when Mister Rogers said it…

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That’s because Mister Rogers meant it.

Mister Rogers genuinely cared about everyone and that’s why he will forever be the best. All of my feels.

True fact: He was considered to be one of the hardest people to interview, because he would turn it around and ask questions about the interviewer with genuine interest. Asking about their children and spouses, their dreams of the future, etc.